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Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
FAO's mandate
Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO's efforts - to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives.
FAO's mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations and contribute to the growth of the world economy.

Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Agricultura y la Alimentación (FAO)
El mandato de la FAO
Alcanzar la seguridad alimentaria para todos, y asegurar que las personas tengan acceso regular a alimentos de buena calidad que les permitan llevar una vida activa y saludable, es la esencia de las actividades de la FAO.El mandato de la FAO consiste en mejorar la nutrición, aumentar la productividad agrícola, elevar el nivel de vida de la población rural y contribuir al crecimiento de la economía mundial.

Organization des Nations Unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture
Le mandat de la FAO
Atteindre la sécurité alimentaire pour tous est au coeur des efforts de la FAO - veiller à ce que les êtres humains aient un accès régulier à une nourriture de bonne qualité qui leur permette de mener une vie saine et active.
Le mandat de la FAO consiste à améliorer les niveaux de nutrition, la productivité agricole et la qualité de vie des populations rurales et contribuer à l’essor de l’économie mondiale.

Country: 
Italy

Technologies from Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

 

Promoting drought tolerant wheat varieties, Shandong Province, China

The Juye County, an area located in a depression zone, receives 500mm average of annual rainfall. However, during the last decades, the unpredictability of a changing climate has exposed this area to serious droughts almost every year in the past years, especially in winter and spring. On the other hand, China is the largest wheat producer in the world, thus it is very important to increase the agricultural resilience to droughts by introducing practical and advanced agricultural technologies. The introduction of these technologies consists in new, more drought wheat cultivars to promote water-saving agricultural production technology and the introduction of soil improvement practices with the application and extension of 3-D cultivation technology.

Beekeeping in Africa: Choosing and rearing a queen

This entry introduces the beekeeper to simple techniques for inducing bees to rear queen bees, in order to replace failing queens and expand his operations. It discusses three different ways in which the colony produces queen cells: supersedure, emergency and swarming queen cells. It then goes on to explain how the beekeeper can simulate an emergency or swarming situation to stimulate the production of queen cells and how to use them to rear a new queen. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Responding to common bee diseases

This entry gives an overview over common brood (like the American and European Brood Foul) and adult bee diseases (like Nosema and the Acarine disease). It enables the beekeeper to identify them and also provides very practical advice on measures to prevent the spread of bee diseases. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Using bees for pollination

The practice of using bees to pollinate fruit crops is as new as the beekeeping industry in most parts of tropical Africa, although the practice has started in a few places in northern and southern Africa. This entry describes how farmers could utilize it to their advantage. The entry introduces the topic and then gives specific advice the issues an agreement between beekeeper and fruit-grower should include. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Honey and bee wax extraction

This entry discusses different methods for honey and bee wax extraction. Traditional methods are critically reviewed and contrasted with other easily applicable methods and/ or instruments like the solar wax-melter, the hot bath method and Ocloo's method (named after a Ghanaian beekeeper). In the last section some practical advice on moulding bee wax after extraction and some useful information about different kinds of honey are provided. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Honey harvesting

In this entry both the timing, the scope of the harvest, which can be expected, the dangers as well as the procedures for honey harvesting are discussed. It gives detailed information on how to open the hive, identify suitable combs and cut the comb honey. While beekeepers are advised to harvest during the night due to the aggressiveness of the African bee, it also presents a method for daytime harvesting. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Colony management I: examining the colony and controlling swarming

A beekeeper with a colonized hive must remember that the success in keeping bees depends on the exercise of his knowledge of colony organization. This entry focuses on practices to examine and control the colony. The first part gives detailed advice on how to inspect a hive and its colony by opening the hive and controlling the individual combs. The second part discusses the phenomenon of swarming and discusses measures to avoid the unwanted separation of a colony. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Colony management III: record-keeping, brood-nest control and preventing robbery

A beekeeper with a colonized hive must remember that the success in keeping bees depends on the exercise of his knowledge of colony organization. Three relevant practices of apiary management are discussed in detail. The first section stresses the importance of record-keeping and introduces methods for colony and operational records. The second part provides information and practical advice to assess the development of a colony and its brooding. The final part discusses the problem of robbing, i.e. the stealing of honey by bees from other colonies. It provides very practical advice on how to prevent or at least minimize the problem. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Colony management II: dividing, uniting and feeding a colony

A beekeeper with a colonized hive must remember that the success in keeping bees depends on the exercise of his knowledge of colony organization. Three practices of colony management are discussed in greater detail in this entry. The first part gives a step-by-step description of how to divide a very good established colony of 9 or more combs. The second part outlines different methods to unite bees to strengthen a colony or in cases where a queen dies or not enough bee hives are available. In a third part advice is provided for feeding bees during rainy and dry seasons or in the early stages of colony formation. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication Beekeeping in Africa.

Beekeeping in Africa: Colonization of a bee hive

This entry discusses different methods of bee hive colonization. It explains how a baited and installed hive can be self-colonized by a bee swarm. For cases where self-colonization is unsuccessful, it outlines three different methods to capture a swarm: two alternative ways of catching a swarm (with a bag/box or with paper and brush/quill) as well as the removal of wild bees from their nest. This technology is part of a series on hive management derived from the FAO publication “Beekeeping in Africa”.