Harvesting

This category contains 6 resources

Rainwater harvesting systems for ntula/eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum L.) growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard ntula/ eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum L.) gardens. This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring ntula production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible. The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. staking, mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Rainwater harvesting systems for tomato growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard tomato gardens. This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring tomato production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible. The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. staking, mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Increasing yield of mango with selective harvest

Due to inaccurate methods of harvesting, farmers tend to destroy the quality of the mangoes and obtain reduced yields of the fruit which results in a loss of income of the farmers. Through selective harvesting techniques, mangoes are harvested in three stages from the trees based on their maturity level. Also, proper picking poles are used to harvest the mangoes in order to avoid dropping them on the ground causing subsequent damage. This technique explains how to properly harvest mangoes and how the mango harvest can be planned in order to reduce post-harvest losses.

Guia para colheita e manuseio pós-colheita da castanha de caju

Produção de castanha de caju de alta qualidade é dependente da aplicação de técnicas excelentes e completas de colheita e pós-colheita e práticas. Esta foto gráfico baseado aleta é usado como parte do material da Iniciativa Caju Africano de extensão. Ele é usado por treinadores e qualquer um que trabalha em fazendas, no campo, diretamente com os agricultores, ensinando e orientando sobre as boas práticas agrícolas recomendadas para o desenvolvimento e manutenção de colheita produtiva e operações pós-colheita. É desgined para ajudar os agricultores de caju entender como abordar o período antes da colheita começa eo que é que depois de terem colhido suas fazendas de caju. Isso é para garantir que seus produtos finais são de extrema qualidade

Management of self-recruiting species in aquaculture

In farmer-managed aquatic systems, poor people do not always have the resources to stock ponds with different fish species. Furthermore, in the dry season, water bodies dry out and access to food sources becomes limited. Self-recruiting species (SRS) are animals that do not require repeated stocking in farmer-managed systems and include both indigenous and exotic species. Management strategies for the maintenance and enhancement of SRS include: keeping of breeding stock, re-stocking of collected juveniles, and screening of pond entrances. These strategies help increase the yield of SRS, without extra financial inputs. This makes them particularly important for poor communities, especially during the dry season when access to other waterbodies is limited.

Preservation of strawberries

Strawberries have to be harvested when 75% of the fruit surface turns red and the berry is still firm. The strawberry fruit perishes easily and deteriorates within 2 to 3 days of harvesting at natural environmental conditions. The temperature is very important for the duration of berry life. Strawberries soften very quickly and become moldy as temperatures rise. So, to keep them longer, fruits must be picked at sunrise, transported to the processing place as soon as possible, and maintained in the shade in a cool place until processing.