Drought

This category contains 29 resources

Rainwater harvesting systems for cabbage growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard cabbage gardens. This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring cabbage production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible. The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Indoor oyster mushroom cultivation for livelihood diversification and increased resilience in Uganda

This practice describes indoor mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation as a means to diversify livelihoods and strengthen the resilience of farmers in Uganda. Indoor mushroom cultivation was promoted by the Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) project on Agriculture Adaptation to Climate Change in the central cattle corridor of Uganda. Mushrooms can be grown at very low cost and in relatively short time. It is a practice that can be adopted by small-scale farmers to diversify their income during the dry season, when lack of water may challenge the cultivation of other crops, and reduce their vulnerability to adverse weather. Indeed, mushroom production is done indoor and it requires little amount of water compared to other crops.

Improved chicken breeds raised with vaccination in Lao PDR

This technology describes the cost-benefit analysis of rearing improved chicken breeds with vaccination in Lao PDR. Improved chicken breeds grow faster and are highly resistant to stresses. Moreover, the improved chickens were vaccinated against cholera and Newcastle diseases, further reducing their mortality rate.

Rooftop water collection, drip irrigation and plastic mulching in home garden conditions in drought prone areas of Cambodia

In Cambodia, drought can have different impacts: delay of rainfall onset in early wet season, erratic variations of rainfall onset, early ending of rains during wet season, and longer dry spell in July and August. This technology describes three different technologies and analyses the costs and benefits of their combined application: rooftop water harvesting, drip irrigation and plastic mulching in home garden conditions. As a result of the combined application of those good practices (GPOs), the resistance against drought is increased and a second cropping period is possible. The GPOs have been tested and validated in 19 Farms in the Kampong Speu (3) and Oddar Meanchey (16) Provinces in Cambodia.

Multi-stress tolerant Green Super Rice in the Philippines. Cost benefit analysis based on field testing of some lines of Green Super Rice

This technology describes the testing of multi-stress tolerant Green Super Rice (GSR) varieties in the Philippines. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

Rainwater harvesting systems for ntula/eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum L.) growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard ntula/ eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum L.) gardens. This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring ntula production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible. The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. staking, mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Improved cattle breeds zero grazing with drought tolerant fodder in Uganda

This technology describes the introduction of improved cattle breeds in Uganda. The improved breeds are more productive and resistant to diseases and are managed applying the zero grazing production system, a type of production system where the animals are kept in an enclosure to control input use and to reduce the incidence of diseases. This breed is fed with drought tolerant fodder to ensure cattle feed availability also in dry seasons. This mix of good practices were introduced to increase productivity and enhance the resilience of cattle raising to increasing dry spells and diseases in the central cattle corridor of Uganda.

How to buffer impacts of climate variability and dry spells in home gardens by using botanical pesticides and liquid compost, Cambodia

This technology offers a low-cost method used in Cambodia to control and manage pests for crop production while limiting adverse impacts of residue toxicity. It describes the methods of producing botanical insecticides and describes how to produce compost using the heap method and how to make liquid compost. The costs and benefits of the combined application of botanical insecticides with the production and use of liquid compost is presented.

Rainwater harvesting systems for tomato growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard tomato gardens. This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring tomato production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible. The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. staking, mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Drought-tolerant maize varieties in Uganda

This technology describes the cultivation of drought-tolerant maize varieties in the central cattle corridor of Uganda, a region particularly exposed to dry spells. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

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