Disaster prevention

This category contains 15 resources

Introduction of silvopastoral systems for cattle raising to sustainably provide fodder to animals in drought periods in Bolivia

This technology describes the introduction of silvopastoral systems in the dry flats of the Chaco eco-region of Bolivia as a good practice to increase the resilience of cattle raisers to recurrent drought.
Silvopastoral systems are a combination of trees, pastures, and livestock. Trees contribute to increased pasture productivity, at the same time they provide a natural shelter to animals. Livestock also benefits from this good practice, especially during the prolonged drought periods when pasture is otherwise generally scarce and mortality rates increase significantly.
This technology briefly introduces the concept of silvopartoral systems and presents a cost-benefit analysis of the practice compared to normal practices for raising cattle.

Indoor oyster mushroom cultivation for livelihood diversification and increased resilience in Uganda

This practice describes indoor mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation as a means to diversify livelihoods and strengthen the resilience of farmers in Uganda. Indoor mushroom cultivation was promoted by the Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) project on Agriculture Adaptation to Climate Change in the central cattle corridor of Uganda.
Mushrooms can be grown at very low cost and in relatively short time. It is a practice that can be adopted by small-scale farmers to diversify their income during the dry season, when lack of water may challenge the cultivation of other crops, and reduce their vulnerability to adverse weather. Indeed, mushroom production is done indoor and it requires little amount of water compared to other crops.

Rainwater harvesting systems for ntula/eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum L.) growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard ntula/ eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum L.) gardens.
This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring ntula production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible.
The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. staking, mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Improved cattle breeds zero grazing with drought tolerant fodder in Uganda

This technology describes the introduction of improved cattle breeds in Uganda. The improved breeds are more productive and resistant to diseases and are managed applying the zero grazing production system, a type of production system where the animals are kept in an enclosure to control input use and to reduce the incidence of diseases. This breed is fed with drought tolerant fodder to ensure cattle feed availability also in dry seasons.
This mix of good practices were introduced to increase productivity and enhance the resilience of cattle raising to increasing dry spells and diseases in the central cattle corridor of Uganda.

How to buffer impacts of climate variability and dry spells in home gardens by using botanical pesticides and liquid compost, Cambodia

This technology offers a low-cost method used in Cambodia to control and manage pests for crop production while limiting adverse impacts of residue toxicity. It describes the methods of producing botanical insecticides and describes how to produce compost using the heap method and how to make liquid compost. The costs and benefits of the combined application of botanical insecticides with the production and use of liquid compost is presented.

Rainwater harvesting systems for tomato growing in Uganda

This technology describes utilizing rooftop water harvesting facilities to increase the availability of water for domestic use and irrigation of backyard tomato gardens.
This measure allows small-scale farmers to harvest rainwater from roofs and store it in tanks, ensuring tomato production also during the dry season, when it would be otherwise impossible.
The combination of rainwater harvesting with other good practices (e.g. staking, mulching, manuring) help increase productivity while reducing soil erosion, eventually strengthening the resilience of farmers to the impact of dry spells.

Drought-tolerant maize varieties in Uganda

This technology describes the cultivation of drought-tolerant maize varieties in the central cattle corridor of Uganda, a region particularly exposed to dry spells. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

Multi-stress tolerant bean varieties in Uganda

This technology describes the testing of multi-stress tolerant bean varieties in the central cattle corridor of Uganda, a region particularly exposed to dry spells. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

Good Practices of Agro-forestry Systems - The Kuxur Rum System in Guatemala to strengthen resilience to the heatwave season in the Ch'ortí Region, Guatemala

This is a translation of the original version in Spanish. In the dry eastern corridor of Guatemala the rural population is highly vulnerable to food insecurity. It is characterized by erratic rains, water limitations, and low yields of traditional crops such as basic grains. Fields are located on dry slopes, approximately between 200-800 meters above sea level and are characterized by are shallow, steep, and stony soils, and often degraded by the intensive cultivation of maize, beans and sorghum, which reduces their aptitude for agriculture. The Kuxur Rum agroforestry practice is based on the indigenous knowledge of using the multipurpose species Gliricidia sepium, combining it with the annual crop production systems, which allows to improve soil moisture conservation, especially in the drought or heatwave period. The practice, called Kuxur Rum, which in the Ch'ortí language means "my wet land", has been promoted in the context of the Special Program for Food Security (known in Spanish as PESA) in the department of Chiquimula, Guatemala. This program was funded by the Spanish Agency for International Cooperation for Development (AECID). This document describes step by step how to establish a Kuxur Rum Agro-forestry system.

Buenas prácticas de Sistemas Agroforestales - El Sistema Kuxur Rum en Guatemala para fortalecer la resiliencia a la época de canícula en la Región de Ch’ortí, Guatemala

En el corredor seco oriental de Guatemala la población rural es altamente vulnerable a la inseguridad alimentaria. Se caracteriza por la irregularidad de lluvias, limitantes hídricos, y bajos rendimientos en cultivos tradicionales de granos básicos. Los terrenos se encuentran sobre laderas secas, aproximadamente entre unos 200-800 metros sobre el nivel del mar. Son suelos poco profundos, escarpados y pedregosos, degradados por el uso intensivo de los cultivos maíz, frijol y sorgo, lo cual reduce su aptitud para la agricultura.
La práctica de agroforestería Kuxur Rum se basa en el conocimiento indígena de aprovechar la especie de árbol multiusos Gliricidia sepium combinándola con los sistemas productivos de cultivos anuales, lo que permite mejorar la conservación de humedad en el suelo, especialmente en la época de sequía o canícula. La práctica se llama Kuxur Rum que en lengua Ch’ortí significa “mi tierra húmeda”, ha sido promovida en el contexto del Programa Especial de Seguridad Alimentaria (PESA) en el departamento de Chiquimula el cual fue financiado por la Agencia Española de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo (AECID). Este documento describe paso a paso como establecer un sistema Agro forestal Kuxur Rum.

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