Climate change

This category contains 11 resources

Indoor oyster mushroom cultivation for livelihood diversification and increased resilience in Uganda

This practice describes indoor mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation as a means to diversify livelihoods and strengthen the resilience of farmers in Uganda. Indoor mushroom cultivation was promoted by the Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) project on Agriculture Adaptation to Climate Change in the central cattle corridor of Uganda.
Mushrooms can be grown at very low cost and in relatively short time. It is a practice that can be adopted by small-scale farmers to diversify their income during the dry season, when lack of water may challenge the cultivation of other crops, and reduce their vulnerability to adverse weather. Indeed, mushroom production is done indoor and it requires little amount of water compared to other crops.

Multi-stress tolerant Green Super Rice in the Philippines. Cost benefit analysis based on field testing of some lines of Green Super Rice

This technology describes the testing of multi-stress tolerant Green Super Rice (GSR) varieties in the Philippines. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

Agroforestry Coffee cultivation in combination with mulching, trenches and organic composting in Uganda

This technology describes a combination of good practices for soil and water conservation that were introduced to coffee farmers in the central cattle corridor of Uganda, with the aim to enhance their resilience to dry spells, pests and diseases, as part of the Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) project on Agriculture Adaptation to Climate Change in Uganda.
The combination of good practices include:
(a) mulching, a low cost practice that consists in covering the soil with locally available degradable plant materials to reduce water runoff and evapotranspiration;
(b) digging contour trenches for harvesting water during the rainy season while preserving soil quality;
(c) preparation and application of organic compost to improve soil fertility at low costs; and
(d) planting shade trees within the coffee plantation in order to provide shade and improve soil fertility.

How to buffer impacts of climate variability and dry spells in home gardens by using botanical pesticides and liquid compost, Cambodia

This technology offers a low-cost method used in Cambodia to control and manage pests for crop production while limiting adverse impacts of residue toxicity. It describes the methods of producing botanical insecticides and describes how to produce compost using the heap method and how to make liquid compost. The costs and benefits of the combined application of botanical insecticides with the production and use of liquid compost is presented.

Drought-tolerant maize varieties in Uganda

This technology describes the cultivation of drought-tolerant maize varieties in the central cattle corridor of Uganda, a region particularly exposed to dry spells. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

Multi-stress tolerant bean varieties in Uganda

This technology describes the testing of multi-stress tolerant bean varieties in the central cattle corridor of Uganda, a region particularly exposed to dry spells. The benefits and constraints compared to local varieties are shown in a cost-benefit analysis.

Peatland restoration in China

This practice gives an overview of activities for restoring the degraded peatlands in the Ruoergai plateau in China, including the blocking of canals and re-establishing vegetation. The water table was raised to rewet adjacent areas and vegetation was regrown in their natural state. The peatland restoration improved grazing land and water quality. Additionally, rewetted peatlands mitigate the effects of climate change by increasing carbon sequestration and decreasing carbon dioxide emissions.

Planting of KS Kuroda variety Carrots to withstand heavy and prolonged rainfall, Philippines

Climate change increases uncertainties in the agriculture sector and directly impacts agricultural production. In the Cordillera region of northern Philippines, erratic precipitation patterns affect water availability during important crop growth stages while drought in some areas make it extremely difficult for farmers to grow crops. Local agriculture workers and farmers in this region have also reported increased occurrence, intensity and length of rainfall events, which increase erosion rates, trigger landslides and make certain crops more susceptible to diseases.
The planting of KS Kuroda variety carrot is a good practice option that can prevent production loss due to heavy and prolonged rainfall. An important characteristic of KS Kuroda identified by the project stakeholders in the Cordillera region is the ability of the roots to withstand rotting (as compared to other less tolerant varieties) during heavy and prolonged precipitation. Rotting of the roots can make the carrots more susceptible to microbial and fungal infections. Planting KS Kuroda carrots can enhance overall resilience in terms of: a) addressing slow onset climate change impacts such as shifting precipitation patterns; and b) reducing risk and impact of current climate variability and extreme weather events such as heavy and erratic rainfall.

Soil property and fertility improvement through composting using Trichoderma, Philippines

Composting improves the physical soil condition and can thereby reduce the risk and impacts of climate variability and extreme weather events such as droughts, dry spells and heavy rains. Healthy soil systems can better respond to temperature increases, changing rainfall patterns, increase evapotranspiration rates, alter pest and disease cycles, etc. Composting improves soil quality by promoting soil aggregation and preventing surface crusting, which enhances water infiltration, plant root penetration and soil aeration. This also prevents surface run-off and erosion. It also conserves the nutrients contained in animal manure, sewage sludge, and similar materials. Further, it supplies the plant growth hormones not found in inorganic fertilizers. Composting likewise increases the buffering capacity of soils and minimizes the adverse effects of soil acidity and alkalinity. These result in reduced farm input costs because less chemical fertilizer is needed. The application of Trichoderma accelerates composting of organic materials available in vegetable farms. For disaster prone countries like the Philippines, soil property and fertility improvement through rapid composting is therefore seen as a good practice option to enhance overall resilience and prevent high production losses due to degraded or eroded soils.

Diversifying cropping patterns in drought prone areas in Bangladesh

Due to the natural climatic conditions in northwestern Bangladesh small-holder farming systems are always exposed to the risk of recurrent droughts. Critical reductions in crop yields occur regularly due to inadequate rainfall. In recent years, however, increasing climate variability has caused even more serious and frequent drought spells, which influence agricultural systems in all stages of growth and consequently the crop yields. The livelihoods of two thirds of the population depending on agriculture and allied sectors are increasingly endangered. Diversification and adjustment of cropping patterns are a way to reduce losses, thus mitigating the impact of droughts on the lives of the rural poor.

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